Leadership Techniques for the Software Architect

Man standing in front of people sitting beside table with laptop computers.

Why is Leadership Important?

The typical path to becoming a software architect begins with years spent in the trenches of hands-on software development. You’ve accumulated technical knowledge that is broad and deep. Along the way you’ve developed your communications skills. And I don’t just mean status reports. I mean by mentoring junior developers, by giving presentations to your peers on the knowledge you have gained in a specific tool, framework or language, and by interacting with systems and business analysts.

Now that you’ve become an architect, more people will look to you as an authority, as an expert. Now you’re starting to provide guidance on software design and the usage of tools and frameworks. Your notice you have more influence. You are now responsible for the technical solution of the product your team is building. You are now in a position of leadership.

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Write More Maintainable Software With a Hexagonal Architecture

Adopting the hexagonal architecture pattern produces software that is more maintainable. It enables you to respond to changes with less fuss than many other architectural patterns. In this article I’ll explain why and offer my thoughts on this pattern.

What is a Hexagonal Architecture?

Alistair Cockburn first coined the term Hexagonal Architecture on his blog in 2005. Also known as the Ports and Adapters pattern, it is a layered architecture. It is a way of separating the domain concerns while making unit tests easier to write and changes simpler to accommodate.

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